For Patients and Caregivers

Diseases we study

Our research efforts are dedicated to improving treatment options for several different types of cancer, including Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, and bladder cancer.

Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a cancer that affects the lymphatic system, which is a part of the body’s immune system.1 HL can cause symptoms such as fever, night sweats, weight loss, fatigue, itchy skin, and enlarged lymph nodes in the neck, underarm, or groin.2

Almost 90% of people with HL survive at least five years after diagnosis.3 Certain factors can affect chance of recovery and treatment options, such as2:

  • Type of Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Age, sex, and general health
  • Signs and symptoms of the cancer
  • Size of the cancer tumors and whether the cancer has spread
  • Whether the cancer is recently diagnosed, continues to grow during treatment, or has returned after treatment

There are many different types of treatments available for HL, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.2 If you have been diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, talk to your doctor about what treatment may be most helpful for you.


Seagen hodgkin hub
Explore stories of real patients

Seagen sponsors Hodgkin Hub, a website that offers information and support for people impacted by Hodgkin lymphoma. Through this resource, you can learn more about life with Hodgkin lymphoma by reading personal stories from real patients and survivors.

Go to Hodgkin Hub


Peripheral T-cell lymphoma

Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a type of rare cancer that affects certain cells in the immune system, called T cells. This kind of cancer is part of a larger group of diseases called non-Hodgkin lymphomas.4

The most common sign of PTCL is an enlarged, painless lymph node in the neck, armpit, or groin. It can also cause symptoms such as night sweats, fevers, weight loss, or rash.4

If you have been diagnosed with PTCL, your doctor may recommend treatment such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, steroids, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, or stem cell transplantation.5



Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare type of cancer that causes certain cells in the immune system, called T cells, to attack the skin.6  This kind of cancer is part of a larger group of diseases called non-Hodgkin lymphomas.7 It is twice as common in men as in women.7

CTCL can cause symptoms such as rash-like skin redness, raised or scaly round patches on the skin, and skin tumors.7

Treatments for CTCL may include skin creams or ointments, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, stem cell transplantation, or bone marrow transplantation.8



Bladder cancer

Bladder cancer is a type of cancer that starts when cells in the bladder grow out of control. Over time, it can spread to other parts of the body. In most cases, bladder cancers begin in the cells lining the bladder. These types of bladder cancers are called urothelial carcinomas.9

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer among men.10 It mostly affects people over the age of 55.10  The most common symptom of bladder cancer is blood in the urine.11 It can also cause other symptoms like pain or burning during urination, trouble urinating, or needing to urinate more often.11

There are several different treatments available for bladder cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.12 If you have been diagnosed with bladder cancer, talk to your doctor about what treatment may be most helpful for you.


Seagen target the tough stuff
Hear from the community

Let’s Target The Tough Stuff was created to start a conversation about bladder cancer and encourage people with bladder cancer to feel comfortable discussing tough topics about their condition. This channel is intended for U.S. residents only.

Go to Let’s Target The Tough Stuff


BREAST CANCER

Breast cancer is a disease in which cells in the breast grow out of control. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can spread outside the breast through blood vessels and lymph vessels. When breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it is said to have metastasized.

Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) may spread to the bones, liver, lungs, brain, or other organs.13

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world.14 There are a few main types of breast cancer:

  • Hormone receptor-positive (HR-positive) breast cancer. This is the most common type of breast cancer. It depends on the hormones estrogen and/or progesterone to grow13
  • Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2-positive) breast cancer. In this type of breast cancer, a type of protein called HER2 causes the cancer to grow15
  • Triple-negative breast cancer. This type of breast cancer does not depend on hormones or HER2 to grow15
  • Triple-positive breast cancer. This type of breast cancer depends on estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 to grow15

Treatment of breast cancer is typically based on the type, stage, and factors such as overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment for advanced and metastatic breast cancer may help shrink tumors and improve symptoms. It can also help people live longer.16 The treatment used depends on the type of breast cancer and may include surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and clinical trials for new drugs and treatment combinations.13



Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women and is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Even with substantial improvement in cancer detection and treatment advances, lung cancer is responsible for about 25 percent of cancer-related deaths worldwide, or about 1.8 million people in 2020.

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer, accounting for approximately 84% of the estimated 228,820 new cases of lung cancer diagnosed each year in the United States.

NSCLC is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the lung. There are several types of NSCLC. Smoking is the major risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer. Signs of non-small cell lung cancer include a cough that does not go away and shortness of breath.

There are several different treatments available for lung cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and clinical trials for new drugs and combinations of treatments. If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer, talk to your doctor about what treatment may be most helpful for you.



Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is a disease in which cancer cells are found inside, near, or on the outer layer of the ovaries. Ovarian cancers were previously believed to begin only in the ovaries, but recent evidence suggests that many ovarian cancers may actually start in the cells in the far end of the fallopian tubes.

Ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer-related death among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. Ovarian cancer has a high risk of recurrence. A recurrence happens when cancer is found after treatment, and after a period of time when the cancer couldn't be detected. Nearly 70 percent of patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer will have a recurrence, with an increased likelihood in advanced stage disease.

Treatment of ovarian cancer are typically based on the type, stage, and factors such as overall health, personal preferences, and whether you plan to have children.

Available treatments options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and clinical trials for new drugs and combinations of treatments. If you have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, talk to your doctor about what treatment may be most helpful for you.


Access patient support

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Interested in a clinical trial?

Learn more about our ongoing clinical trials in different types of cancer.

Understanding Clinical Trials

References

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  1. What is Hodgkin lymphoma? American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkin-lymphoma/about/what-is-hodgkin-disease.html. Updated May 1, 2018. Accessed May 6, 2020.
  2. Adult Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (PDQ®)–patient version. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/lymphoma/patient/adult-hodgkin-treatment-pdq. Updated April 3, 2020. Accessed May 6, 2020.
  3. Hodgkin lymphoma - cancer stat facts. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER). https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/hodg.html. Accessed May 6, 2020.
  4. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma facts. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. https://www.lls.org/sites/default/files/file_assets/peripheraltcelllymphomafacts.pdf. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  5. Treating T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/non-hodgkin-lymphoma/treating/t-cell-lymphoma.html. Updated November 19, 2018. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  6. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma symptoms & causes. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cutaneous-t-cell-lymphoma/symptoms-causes/syc-20351056. Published February 9, 2019. Accessed May 6, 2020.
  7. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/cutaneous-t-cell-lymphomas/. Accessed May 6, 2020.
  8. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma diagnosis & treatment. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cutaneous-t-cell-lymphoma/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20351057. Published February 9, 2019. Accessed May 11, 2020.
  9. About bladder cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/bladder-cancer/about/what-is-bladder-cancer.html. Updated January 30, 2019. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  10. Bladder cancer: statistics. Cancer.Net. https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/bladder-cancer/statistics. Accessed May 7, 2020.
  11. Bladder cancer early detection, diagnosis, and staging. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/bladder-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/detection.html. Updated January 30, 2019. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  12. Treating bladder cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/bladder-cancer/treating.html. Updated January 23, 2020. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  13. Breast cancer treatment (adult) (PDQ®)–patient version. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/patient/breast-treatment-pdq. Updated November 21, 2019. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  14. Breast cancer statistics. World Cancer Research Fund. https://www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer/cancer-trends/breast-cancer-statistics. Accessed May 7, 2020.
  15. Breast cancer HER2 status. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/understanding-a-breast-cancer-diagnosis/breast-cancer-her2-status.html. Updated September 20, 2019. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  16. Treatment of stage IV (metastatic) breast cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/treatment/treatment-of-breast-cancer-by-stage/treatment-of-stage-iv-advanced-breast-cancer.html. Updated April 21, 2020. Accessed May 14, 2020.
  17. Global cancer observatory. International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://gco.iarc.fr/. Updated September 2020. Accessed September 28, 2020.
  18. Non-small cell lung cancer treatment. National Cancer Institute. https://www.cancer.gov/types/lung/patient/non-small-cell-lung-treatment-pdq. Updated May 20, 2020. Accessed September 28, 2020.
  19. Lung and Bronchus Cancer — Cancer Stat Facts. National Cancer Institute. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/lungb.html. Accessed September 28, 2020.
  20. Treating ovarian cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/treating.html. Accessed September 28, 2020.
  21. Frequently asked questions about ovarian cancer. Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance. https://ocrahope.org/patients/about-ovarian-cancer/faq/. Accessed September 28, 2020.